Nicole Collins & Tannis Nielsen | Boundless Questions II

BOUNDLESS QUESTIONS II
|NICOLE COLLINS & TANNIS NIELSEN

Nicole Collins and Tannis Nielsen meet at the Koffler Gallery to explore connections between their artistic practices in an unmediated conversation. They discuss the role of artmaking in their individual grieving processes and share thoughts on the broader possibilities of art in engaging with existential questions. This conversation continues along ideas examined by is inspired by Boundless Questions, a panel discussion organized in conjunction with Nicole Collins: Furthest Boundless, a Koffler Gallery exhibition.

BOUNDLESS QUESTIONS II
|NICOLE COLLINS & TANNIS NIELSEN

Nicole Collins and Tannis Nielsen meet at the Koffler Gallery to explore connections between their artistic practices in an unmediated conversation. They discuss the role of artmaking in their individual grieving processes and share thoughts on the broader possibilities of art in engaging with existential questions. This conversation continues along ideas examined by is inspired by Boundless Questions, a panel discussion organized in conjunction with Nicole Collins: Furthest Boundless, a Koffler Gallery exhibition.


NICOLE COLLINS | Nicole's artistic practice focuses on the effect of time, accumulation, force and heat on visceral materials, through painting, drawing, installation, intervention, video, and sound. Since 1994 she has exhibited extensively including solo exhibitions at The University of Waterloo Art Gallery (2013), The Art Gallery of Ontario (2013) and The Embassy of Canada in Tokyo (2001) and group exhibitions in Toronto, Hamilton, St. Johns, New York, Miami, London and Zurich. Her work has been featured online and in magazines, newspapers and books including the major survey Abstract Painting in Canada (Roald Nasgaard), the 3rd edition of A Concise History of Canadian Painting (Dennis Reid), Carte Blanche, Volume 2: Painting, and The Donovan Collection Catalogue. Collins is an Assistant Professor in the Drawing & Painting program at the Ontario College of Art & Design University (OCADU) and she lives in Toronto with her husband artist Michael Davidson and their daughter. Collins' work is represented by General Hardware Contemporary Art in Toronto.

TANNIS NIELSEN | Tannis (a Métis Woman of Saulteaux/Anishnawbe and Danish descent) has twenty years of professional experience in the arts, cultural and community sectors, and ten years teaching practice at the post-secondary level. She holds a Masters in Visual Studies Degree (M.V.S.) from the University of Toronto. Tannis’ studio expertise includes: painting, new media, performance, drawing and sculpture. Her academic research and teaching practice engages with the areas of anti-colonial theory, natural law/Indigenous governance, Indigenous arts activism(s), and the relative investigations of Indigenous science and Western quantum physics. In 2006, Tannis’ dissertation asserted the need for localized Indigenous contexts to be inserted accurately within the structures of the academy by visually illustrating the negative consequence of colonial trauma on Indigenous culture/land/language, familial relationships, and memory. Her thesis titled “Not Forgotten,” emphasized this positioning by repudiating the need of utilizing an English/imperialist punctuation and capitalization in its text. Tannis’ community service includes sitting as advisory member to Native Women in the Arts (NWIA), The Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Program (CCWWP), and past President of The Association for Native Development in the Performing and Visual Arts (A.N.D.P.V.A.). She’s also volunteered with the Toronto Native Community History Project where she assisted in re-igniting “The Great Indian Bus Tour of Toronto” of which she acted as a ‘tour guide’ on three occasions. Currently, Tannis holds a position in the Teaching Intensive Stream at OCAD-University and is working on a large scale public art commission for The City of Toronto.

NICOLE COLLINS | Nicole's artistic practice focuses on the effect of time, accumulation, force and heat on visceral materials, through painting, drawing, installation, intervention, video, and sound. Since 1994 she has exhibited extensively including solo exhibitions at The University of Waterloo Art Gallery (2013), The Art Gallery of Ontario (2013) and The Embassy of Canada in Tokyo (2001) and group exhibitions in Toronto, Hamilton, St. Johns, New York, Miami, London and Zurich. Her work has been featured online and in magazines, newspapers and books including the major survey Abstract Painting in Canada (Roald Nasgaard), the 3rd edition of A Concise History of Canadian Painting (Dennis Reid), Carte Blanche, Volume 2: Painting, and The Donovan Collection Catalogue. Collins is an Assistant Professor in the Drawing & Painting program at the Ontario College of Art & Design University (OCADU) and she lives in Toronto with her husband artist Michael Davidson and their daughter. Collins' work is represented by General Hardware Contemporary Art in Toronto.

TANNIS NIELSEN | Tannis (a Métis Woman of Saulteaux/Anishnawbe and Danish descent) has twenty years of professional experience in the arts, cultural and community sectors, and ten years teaching practice at the post-secondary level. She holds a Masters in Visual Studies Degree (M.V.S.) from the University of Toronto. Tannis’ studio expertise includes: painting, new media, performance, drawing and sculpture. Her academic research and teaching practice engages with the areas of anti-colonial theory, natural law/Indigenous governance, Indigenous arts activism(s), and the relative investigations of Indigenous science and Western quantum physics. In 2006, Tannis’ dissertation asserted the need for localized Indigenous contexts to be inserted accurately within the structures of the academy by visually illustrating the negative consequence of colonial trauma on Indigenous culture/land/language, familial relationships, and memory. Her thesis titled “Not Forgotten,” emphasized this positioning by repudiating the need of utilizing an English/imperialist punctuation and capitalization in its text. Tannis’ community service includes sitting as advisory member to Native Women in the Arts (NWIA), The Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Program (CCWWP), and past President of The Association for Native Development in the Performing and Visual Arts (A.N.D.P.V.A.). She’s also volunteered with the Toronto Native Community History Project where she assisted in re-igniting “The Great Indian Bus Tour of Toronto” of which she acted as a ‘tour guide’ on three occasions. Currently, Tannis holds a position in the Teaching Intensive Stream at OCAD-University and is working on a large scale public art commission for The City of Toronto.


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